Share

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

#001: Common Struggles Among Ministry Leaders with Dr. John Delony

What do multiple Ph.D.’s, 3-pound gummy bears, and a church leader from Australia have in common? The very first episode of the Ministry to Parents podcast! In this episode, we invite Dr. John Delony, from Ramsey Solutions, to share encouragement with us on how to deal with the everyday struggles we face in ministry. From loneliness to performance, we have a real, raw, and honest conversation about the pressures of life and church leadership. From Australia, M2P Member Kylie Hofer, speaks her voice about the difficulties of ministry, and from Virginia, M2P Member Tom Maxwell, talks Kanye and Yeezy’s! Hang on for the wild ride and enjoy the first episode of the Ministry to Parents Podcast.

What do multiple Ph.D.’s, 3-pound gummy bears, and a church leader from Australia have in common? The very first episode of the Ministry to Parents podcast!

In this episode, we invite Dr. John Delony, from Ramsey Solutions, to share encouragement with us on how to deal with the everyday struggles we face in ministry. From loneliness to performance, we have a real, raw, and honest conversation about the pressures of life and church leadership.

From Australia, M2P Member Kylie Hofer, speaks her voice about the difficulties of ministry, and from Virginia, M2P Member Tom Maxwell, talks Kanye and Yeezy’s!

Hang on for the wild ride and enjoy the first episode of the Ministry to Parents Podcast.

Karen Bastible
Hi, my name is Karen Bastible, and I'm from Weatherford, TX. My church is Waterhouse Church and I'm a proud member of Ministry to Parents.

Jeremy Lee
Welcome to the Ministry to Parents podcast. Here's your hosts, Elisabeth and Jeremy Lee. It's our first episode of the Ministry to Parents podcast, I'm so excited. Oh, this is such a big deal. We just we love our members. We love just our community at Ministry to Parents. And this is a way for us to get to speak to you and you to speak back to us. This is the podcast for church leaders that helps you build a Ministry to Parents.

Jeremy Lee
We want to help you do that. And that's why we're here. Yay!

Elisabeth Lee
Yes. We are very passionate about helping church leaders. And it's something that is close to our hearts. And so we just thank you for taking the time. You could be doing so many other things right now and just grateful that you're here. I'm Elisabeth Lee.

Jeremy Lee
I'm Jeremy Lee. And listen. You are not just church leaders who put together a ministry plan. You help parents. You encourage them with anything they're struggling with and you're helping them lead their kids.

Jeremy Lee
All these things are the things we talk about. But one of the biggest things we want to talk about is care for the soul. That's one of our four mile markers, milestones along the Ministry to Parents road map we create for our members. We do that intentionally because you guys are people and humans have struggles. And that's what we're going to be talking about today.

Jeremy Lee
We're going to be talking about the struggles that all of us face as church leaders, but we don't really enjoy talking about. Not a great topic to start your podcast on, starting with talking about things people don't want to talk about. That's awkward. But struggles in general is kind of the theme of 2020, you know. Oh, goodness. We live in Nashville, we have a Mexican restaurant who's sign outside is pretty famous for saying clever things.

Jeremy Lee
And they said the other day, I hope 2020 is like a mullet where the first half of the year is the front and the party's in the back! I'm kind of down with that. It feels like everywhere you turn, 2020 is throwing something at us. That's just crazy. Covid, pandemics, but even thinking lately about back to school, and that's kind of where we are right now in the year. Yes.

Elisabeth Lee
And with Nashville in particular, there is a tornado that hit right before the quarantine came in. And then, of course, you have the economic recession. But of course, if we keep listening, it's just going to go downhill.

Jeremy Lee
So that's super depressing. Super depressing.

Elisabeth Lee
The back to school piece is definitely I've been laughing at all the different things on social media. That said, I don't know that I care whether or not about how you feel about a mask. You know, it's almost like there's this dividing line of wear mask, no mask, wear mask, no mask.

Elisabeth Lee
And it's the big debate. And it's also just tough. It's a tough call. As a parent in the back to school world of are they going or are they not going? Virtual learning. Distance learning. I mean, it's a lot.

Jeremy Lee
I see parents posting things like there are no good choices whether they open schools or don't open schools, no matter what they choose. I'm either going to be this frustrated homeschool parent or this nervous Nellie scared parent that my I'm sending my kid to their death at school and it doesn't feel like there's a great choice anywhere. Same with church. Some of your churches are closed, and they're only doing online type stuff. Some of them are open and. And you're kind of rolling with it.

Jeremy Lee
I read this the other day. You just wish somebody would be the adult in the room and just tell you what to do. But it doesn't feel like there's anybody around. And unfortunately, I think it might be us. And we're looking around going, oh, my goodness, I don't really know exactly what to do. Somebody help me. But there doesn't seem to anybody coming to help us with this.

Jeremy Lee
We have to figure it out.

Elisabeth Lee
And that's one of the reasons why Jeremy and I've been so passionate about the podcast for you guys is because we know that you have a whole lot of eyes looking to you. And there's a whole lot coming at you, not just as a person, but as a ministry leader. But also, if you have a family, there's just all these different roles, responsibilities, expectations coming at you. And so we want to encourage you. And what that is, is we want to speak courage into you.

Elisabeth Lee
And we hope on every Tuesday that when you come to this podcast that when you put it on, you may come in tired. But when you leave, you feel like you can fly. You know, the whole Michael Jordan, "I believe I can fly"space jam thing. That's the goal. And because we've listed just in the last few minutes, we've been talking I can start feeling my anxiety rising, just talking about it. And so I know I'm not the only person out there that feels that way.

Elisabeth Lee
And so it's time to gather together, collectively, speak courage into us as a church.

Jeremy Lee
And for those of you who don't know, administrative parents is we are a member based resource. So we have churches and church leaders that join us and they become. Members, and then we kind of all work together to build their ministry to parents. So that gives us an insight to couple of thousand churches across the country. And that's one of the things we want to offer you is some of that insight. And here's what we're hearing from you guys.

Jeremy Lee
You're telling us that you're working harder than ever. People are thinking your children at home in your pajamas, but now you're doing online church and real life church and dealing with all of the the trauma and stress and horrible things that are happening. You're having to show up for that and you're just helping people through this hard time while you're trying to go through a hard time yourself. It sums up perfectly. Elisabeth, I saw this tweet and I wanted to share it with you.

Jeremy Lee
It's from @joshmrowley. Wherever you are, brother, I feel you because you summed it up for all of us. It says this "ministry is both more difficult and less rewarding right now." Mm hmm. Mm hmm. That's kind of where we are. I can just hear the groan across the Internet.

Elisabeth Lee
Oh, yes. Ministries both more difficult and less rewarding. And I think the rewarding peace comes because, you see, it's interactive, it's interpersonal relationships. And so one of the things that currently we do in our roadmap, the M2P road map, is we have care for the soul. And this month in particular, that's the theme of our content. And because we want to speak courage into you, while you're speaking into the people you're leading this month in particular, we did a a spiritual retreat guide for you.

Elisabeth Lee
So it's not one of those things where you go away, obviously with COVID and quarantine, the traveling piece is not a part of that or even maybe even getting out of the house. But we created it. More about retreat is to it's based on the Sabbath, right. To cease from working.

Elisabeth Lee
And we kind of go through just what does it look like to intentionally build a dream for your heart? And that's what this little retreat guide is for. So if you're an M2P member, you can grab that there and we want to help speak courage into you as you take care of yourself.

Jeremy Lee
And that is going to be a great if you're a member, that's in the ministry toolbox. Just click on over there, grab it, download it. And we hope from our heart to yours, that is a really cool way for you to begin kind of taking care of your own personal health so that you're free to take care of others. And another resource for all of you is the rest of his podcasts. We have a great guest from the Dave Ramsey team.

Jeremy Lee
He's one of the Ramsey personalities. His name's Dr. John Delony.

Jeremy Lee
He is full of great wisdom. He's got multiple Phd's. And he's worked with all these universities and organizations. Super, super smart guy. He's got the training and heart of a counselor. And he says in the interview he loves ministers. So we're going to be helping. He's going to help us kind of unpack the heart stuff inside of us. I'm going to say it like this. It's like a free counseling session. You're about to have so....

Jeremy Lee
Just kind of settle in and enjoy that. And this idea of struggle. I think we want to introduce the topic a little bit, but just kind of thinking through what some of those struggles are. Elizabeth and I are going to take a turn sharing some of the struggles we've had in our ministry times. But we also asked our members and we had one great response that we want to share with from Kylie Hoffer. She is in Australia. She's been one of our members for years.

Jeremy Lee
We love Kylie. And this is what she had to say about the struggles that she sees church leaders going through.

Kylie Hofer
Hi, my name is Kylie Hoffer from Woodbury Community Church in Western Australia, and one of the common struggles I see church leaders face is getting so caught up in the feeding or growing of others and forgetting to invest in their own personal relationship with Jesus. It reminds me of Mary and Martha in Luke 10. I know in my personal experience, I get so caught up and busy doing and I need to consciously slow down be still and sit at the feet of Jesus.

Yes, thank you, Kylie. That was good, right? And plus, it's always good to have an Australian accent on your first podcast.

Kylie, I, I really, really appreciate what you had to say. And I wrote down the word consciously, as you're speaking, because it's about intentionality and consciously choosing because it is a choice. And we have to be conscious about that choice. And easy for us to talk about. Hard to do. So thank you, Kylie. That's really good.

Jeremy Lee
And moving into the struggle that I face in ministry, it's really ends up for me being an identity issue. One of the things that I love to do is communicate and preach. And I was kind of trained early on to be a preacher. Unfortunately, though, for me, that preaching turned into a performance and maybe some of you can relate. And I got a lot of good encouragement and that really began to speak to my identity and my worth and my value.

Jeremy Lee
And that really connected too much. And I really got skewed and went for years and years and years with that struggle. That was one of the ones that hit me hard. What about you? What are some struggles that you have in ministry?

Elisabeth Lee
Well, I think one of the main ones was being a recovering from co-dependency. I had really struggled early on in ministry of feeling responsible for everyone . I was a women's minister for a few years and I was a student ministry leader for a few years. And I just felt responsible for. These families or I was responsible for these women and their spiritual journeys. And it took a lot of therapy and a lot of help from wise counsellors to just recognize that that's not my role.

Elisabeth Lee
It's not my responsibility to bear.

Elisabeth Lee
It's my job to as Kylie said to be the Mary, to sit and to.

Elisabeth Lee
Really enjoy my relationship with Jesus because He is so kind and so loving and He has things to say through the spirit and so to feel from that and to enjoy it. And that's not just like a one time five minutes in the morning, 20 minutes in the morning. It's truly an all day as I'm going. He's always with me. He's in the car doing school pick up and running errands. And it's a presence. It's the John 15 abide piece that's present.

Elisabeth Lee
That verb that's present means it's always happening, always going. And and that's in essence, when I come from that place, then I recognize while I'm in ministry that I'm not responsible for the people that I'm serving. I'm not responsible for them. I'm responsible to them. And that little shift in that word really helped me and continues to help me. It'll be something that I'll continually focus on everyday when I get up in the morning, which is I'm responsible to people, but I'm not responsible for them.

Elisabeth Lee
And there's a difference. So, that would probably one of my main struggles.

Jeremy Lee
And if you can hear our hearts, if we could just like open up our chests and let you inside for a second, it would be to speak. We're going to be speaking all month long on this topic.

Jeremy Lee
Every week we're going to come back and try to offer some kind of hope and some kind of encouragement, because it's my belief that we are the first responders to the soul.

Jeremy Lee
As church leaders, we have to show up for people in some of their darkest and hardest times. But the reality is it's so hard to be there for others. And then at the same time, be there for ourselves. And if there's a common thread, whether it be family issues, marriage issues, addictions, habits, struggles, relationally hurt from church leadership, there's all kinds of things that we're all struggling with. But at the end of the day, we've got to meet Jesus at the feet of Jesus and find that healing.

Jeremy Lee
And and if we don't, then we find ourselves falling in that burnout hole of not being able to recover and always feeling like we're a mile behind. And we don't want that for you. And so that's our goal, because at the end of the day, how can we talk about ministering to parents when we don't learn how to regularly and in a healthy way minister to ourselves? So let's talk more about that after the break. We're going to have Dr. John Delony. We're going to grill him with all kinds of questions about how we can work through these struggles and find hope. We'll talk to you right after the break.

Elisabeth Lee
Welcome back to the Ministry, the parents podcast. We are going to continue the conversation on dealing with the struggles that we face in ministry.

Jeremy Lee
And this conversation is incredibly important. I don't think there's any of us that are listening that are 100 percent exempt from the struggling. Yes. And the reality is we're all on a budget. So therapy ain't cheap. This guy is a legit therapist that we're talking to today, and he brings some pretty darn good therapy. So sit back, relax, guys, and realize enjoy the show. This is therapy at a value. A little free session here.

Elisabeth Lee
So today we're talking with Dr.John Delony about these conversations.

Elisabeth Lee
And he just has some really good insight to share with you, with us. He is a leading voice on relationships and emotional wellness. And before becoming a Ramsey personality, he worked for two decades in crisis response and I think two decades in crisis response. That's like no joke, you know. So he definitely has a lot to offer us. And he's also been a senior leader at multiple universities. He holds two PHD's, one in counseling and the other in higher education.

Elisabeth Lee
And you can learn more about him at www.johndelony.com.

Jeremy Lee
I really want to say a quick thanks to Dave Ramsey and the Ramsey Solutions team for making him available to us. It's really cool.

Jeremy Lee
Great way to start our podcast for sure. So what I love about John is that he was telling me when he did his Phd research that he studied the mental health of doctors, lawyers and pastors.

Jeremy Lee
Now, think about that.

Elisabeth Lee
The fact that there lumped in with doctors and lawyers. Enough said.

Jeremy Lee
Yeah. It just tells you. But also his his dad was a homicide detective who was on the SWAT team as well. And but then eventually became a minister. So you can kind of see what's fueling his passions a little bit. He's exploring really this idea of highly stressful jobs and how to maintain health in the midst of it, which.

Jeremy Lee
Goodness gracious is right on point with where we're at. So this is the first topic we brought up with him, which was how do public leaders like church leaders, how can a public leader get help with a private struggle? And here's what he had to say.

Dr. John Delony
The first thing is, is this idea of image consciousness versus modeling. And so what I think a a minister, a children's minister, a youth minister especially, can do that can be like a family tree changing gift for the young people and their parents is to model what grieving looks like and model what faith questions look like and what they can do is a lot of hurt when they pretend those things don't exist, because then people are trying to live into a picture of what they think a faith follower looks like.

Dr. John Delony
And it's unobtainable if it doesn't include sadness and doesn't include low days and it doesn't include the heavy questions and needing to reach out to mentors. And so one of the things that I've seen over the over the last several years that melt ministers is this idea that they've got to perform in a certain way. And eventually that performance, that sitting on their feelings, sitting on their frustrations or their fears. We call it leakage in the counseling world.

Dr. John Delony
It will find its way out. Then usually it comes out in spectacular fashion. If they don't deal with it on a regular basis.

Elisabeth Lee
Goodness.

Jeremy Lee
Isn't that good?

Elisabeth Lee
Yes. You know, I think is that when I when I listen to what he had to say, I think when he said it comes out in spectacular fashion, all I can say is that happened for me at the age of twenty nine. It happened earlier. I mean, I guess I burned out quicker than a lot of people.

Elisabeth Lee
But for me, I definitely was on the performance track and I was on the image really wanting to think I need to have it all together. Feeling all this pressure and not seeking help or counsel because at that point I didn't really understand the value of emotional intelligence and emotional wellness, and I really didn't know where to go. And there was obviously a lot of, "I have this I can get this under control."

Elisabeth Lee
"I don't need help". And also, there was a lot of ego involved because I didn't want to have to admit I was struggling. And it definitely showed up when when he talks about it's going to leak. I just thought at some point that I was invincible and that maybe I could just overcome it. And you and I both know that there's so much pain. It's part of our story. And what he has to say is so much a part of, we are where we are today because we've walked through this in a hard way.

Elisabeth Lee
We have the scars to mark it. But it's beautiful because what Jesus has done with it, because there is nothing that he can't heal and he's healed so much of it. And we're here today because he's healed this part of our story.

Jeremy Lee
And in this next part of I want to flag our listeners to just listen for the way he talks about rocks in a backpack. Just listen for that part.

Jeremy Lee
It's, uh, it's super good. And just as a dude, as a man and I don't want to be overly generally stereotyping. Because I know, we all kind of cross in those struggles. But men, we aren't open and vulnerable. And so when he talks about being open and vulnerable and friendships and bonding people, that's not easy. And, that's that's the next part.

Dr. John Delony
But normally what happens for a minister is especially in the last I've seen a shift in less three to five years.

Dr. John Delony
They are surrounded by people at their church or specific elders or church leaders who are designed to pray for them, be there, accountability people. But what I've found over the years is that I'm not going to go to my bosses, which to use an HR term, like I'm not going to go to my bosses to talk about struggle. Them having that might cost me my job or that I feel like I'm going to have to be on guard in some shape, form or fashion.

Dr. John Delony
And so what you mentioned the clinical term, what you mentioned is secondary traumatic stress. And so we often think of trauma as something that's acute, that happens like you see a car wreck or you're in a someone you love passes away. But secondary traumatic stress is cumulative and it it can be. The analogy I give folks is we all have a backpack and we can have a trauma that's dropped in there like a cinder block, or we can collect pebbles over time.

Dr. John Delony
But at the end of the day, that weight is the same. And so what a minister does for a living, like you mentioned, is they take other people's pain, they take other people's rocks. And if they don't have a plan to get them out of their backpack, then it will collapse them. And so the only way to to usher those those rocks out of our backpacks is through other people. And not only other people, but being vulnerable to other people.

Dr. John Delony
And there's nobody better at smiling and being with people without being vulnerable than a group of pastors. There magic at that. So they have to be intentional about finding people that are not their bosses, that are not their spouses often that they can be in vulnerable relationship with. And that, to me, is the magic moment when a pastor can have a long term career where they can stay healthy and help those around them or they're going to implode and end up getting out of the ministry altogether.

Jeremy Lee
That was good magic moment. Very good. I think, again, that you talked about how the last one was very real for you. This one was very real for me. The need to connect and find people outside of my spouse, outside of the people that I work with, and to find healthy places again, just as a dude.,But just me personally. That's not easy. It requires vulnerability that I'm having to get in touch with. Through therapy and in therapy, by the way, just so you'll understand this about us. We go to therapy at least once a month, as much as we can afford because we want to stay married and we're seeking health. Emotional and spiritual health.

Elisabeth Lee
And we've been going to therapy for, what, at least 10 years. At this point. And it's been consistent. And we're learning. I think he nailed it when he said. He said pastors. But I think just church leaders in general. We know how to smile, show up, shake hands without being vulnerable.

Elisabeth Lee
There is a professor out of Houston, Texas, named Dr. Brene Brown, and she defines vulnerability as emotional exposure, risk and uncertainty. And I think to myself, that is definitely not how you want to show up on your job on Sunday morning.

Jeremy Lee
That doesn't sound like a good time to me.

Elisabeth Lee
But I love what he said is you can't do that. And sometimes it's not with your spouse when you're going to talk about those rocks in the backpack. And it's not definitely with your boss. Right. So you got to go find somebody who's safe, who can help you unpack the rocks in your backpack. And I think that can be, if it's not a therapist at some point, it's someone who maybe is a wise mentor or counselor.

Elisabeth Lee
You know, we've had those, too. You know, I think about the people who we've been able to help unpack in our backpacks who have walked all the way mentors in the people who've held our hands along the way.

Jeremy Lee
And that's our encouragement if you're listening. He talked about that magic moment. That is the magic moment. And so ask yourself. And maybe ask God, can you provide that in my life? Because I know the natural next question.

Jeremy Lee
If you're if you're following along is well, where in the world do I find that. Right.

Jeremy Lee
And I wish I had a great answer for you, but I do know that these are the places where you come crying to God and you ask.

Jeremy Lee
Because we've been in therapy, one of the things I know is that we usually go to therapy for one purpose and then we come to discover that's just a symptom of an underlying issue. So we brought that up with Dr. John Delony and he had some really cool things to say about it. This is what he had to say.

Dr. John Delony
I think the chief demon of our time, particularly for ministers, this moment of. And I think that the cascading ripple effects of loneliness, both culturally and in the ministry, is devastating. Even if you just look at the American Medical Association put out in November what seems like one hundred years ago, that the life expectancy in the U.S. had gone down again for the third straight year. And it's not for murder and it's not for crimes, things like that.

Dr. John Delony
They're calling them diseases of despair, which we're the most connected, yet disconnected group of human beings to ever walk the planet. And so when our brains are scanning the environment for when we're out of sync with our communities, when we are not being social, then it starts doing crazy things like it starts dividing the world up into us and them and it starts displacing anger. And it starts looking for dopamine hits wherever it can get them, whether that's through extramarital relationships or through buying stuff or over exercising or overeating.

Dr. John Delony
And so you look at the pathologies, right? The things that, you know, I'm going to counseling because I had an affair. I'm going to count them because I overeat or I work out too much. You're right. What's actually pointing to some of the demons are we are totally lonely. We don't know how to be in relationship with each other or we don't know if we're totally buy what we're selling theologically. That's how we're making our money.

Dr. John Delony
And that incongruence is wearing on us over time or people are coming up with how to deal with their marriages. And me and my wife aren't talking anymore. And so. And that weighs on us. Right. So, yeah, it's easy to point at the thing. We're going to get this one thing fixed, but you end up finding a whole well of other challenges that really in my world have just come down to very few things, which is loneliness, loneliness, loneliness, being the chief of them.

Elisabeth Lee
I would absolutely, wholeheartedly agree.

Jeremy Lee
We're over here. It's a meeting. I mean, we've heard this before, but we're just like, she's giving me the heart emoji across the room

Elisabeth Lee
because I think, isn't it? And we have talked about this like we've all been married 23 years and at the end of August.

Elisabeth Lee
And it's funny how you can be in a marriage and feel lonely. And so she's been helping us learn how to be vulnerable with each other and how to be vulnerable with other friends and then think about. So you have a marriage relationship.

Elisabeth Lee
Or you could be single and you're working through loneliness there. Or you could be in a marriage and be lonely and then you could be lonely and have a ton of friends or, you know, because that vulnerability piece is underlying it, because I have to be myself.

Elisabeth Lee
It's going to require risky emotional exposure, uncertainty. And if I am those things, will someone show up and love that and accept that who I am? All my flaws. Right. And then take that put it in a ministry setting, a church leadership setting.

Elisabeth Lee
And that's how it gets tough, you know,

Jeremy Lee
To be known. But to have no one really know you. Yeah. Mm hmm. I mean.

Jeremy Lee
Yeah. And the thing about it is and this is real stuff. It's not going to be solved on a podcast. But what I'm hoping is that this is an inspiration. And I'll just if I can get super practical it's kind of way my mind works. One of the reasons therapy works for me, and this is not necessarily a commercial for therapy, but it kind of is one of the reasons therapy works for me is because it's a place where I can pay to practice vulnerability because I can sue that joker if he says anything that I said.

Jeremy Lee
So it's a safe place. I call it an emotional massage when I'm done with it. I'll just leave and I'm like, oh my goodness, that felt so good to say things that I would never normally say and feel safe about it because legally they can't. Yeah, you do have to pay for it, but it's it's a great first step.

Jeremy Lee
And then what happens though, is the longer I've done it, the more I feel comfortable finding and knowing how to develop safe friendships that give me the same thing for free.

Jeremy Lee
And then I can provide to others. Yes.

Elisabeth Lee
And I think to Dr. Cloud and Townsend had a great one time. They're experts in the field of emotional intelligence. And one time they said that our community that Dr. John Delony's been talking about, they are the place where Jesus heals and he heals through people. Our community was one of the ways he heals in multiple ways. But one of the ways he does is there our community and often the needs and the wounds that we have. When Jesus heals them, he heals them through the community in which we live, the people that we live life with.

Elisabeth Lee
And it's our family or friends. And that's how he heals. It's through the community.

Jeremy Lee
Well, kudos to Dave Ramsey for finding Dr. John Delony and love that Dave Ramsey that he talks about money. Beautiful. He's helped us in those areas, too. But the fact that he's willing to bring on this conversation of emotional health and probably I'm assuming they're going to talk about how that links to money. Beautiful, smart. And just had a blast having him.

Elisabeth Lee
If you want to read the full transcript of the conversation, you can go to the blog at www.ministrytoparents.com. And if you want to learn more about Dr. John Delony, you can go to his Web site. www.JohnDelony.com...And we'll be right back after the break.

M2P podcast
[The third segment of our show was a silly game played with Tom Maxwell, our M2P member from Virginia. We did not include that in the transcription]

powered by

Want Us to Answer Your Questions?

Fill out the form below to submit your questions to us. We will try to answer as many we can. 

Thank You!

We have recieved you question(s). We will try our best to answer them for you.